Tag Archives: complex networks

CNetS team winner in LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge

The CNetS team
The CNetS team

LinkedIn announced that YY Ahn and his team of Ph.D. students from the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, including Yizhi Jing, Adazeh Nematzadeh, Jaehyuk Park, and Ian Wood, is one of the 11 winners of the LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge.

Their project, “Forecasting large-scale industrial evolution,” aims to understand the macro-evolution of industries to track businesses and emerging skills. This data would be used to forecast economic trends and guide professionals toward promising career paths.

“This is a fascinating opportunity to study the network of industries and people with unprecedented details and size. All of us are very excited to collaborate with LinkedIn and our LinkedIn mentor, Mike Conover, who is a recent Informatics PhD alumnus, on this topic,” said Ahn. Read more…

New CASCI papers on Complex Networks

Network Science Journal
Network Science

Read new papers from CASCI on developing the mathematical toolbox available to deal with computing distances on weighted graphs, applying distance closures for computational fact checking, and computing multi-scale integration in brain networks:

T. Simas and L.M. Rocha [2015].”Distance Closures on Complex Networks”. Network Science, doi:10.1017/nws.2015.11.

G.L. Ciampaglia, P. Shiralkar, L.M. Rocha, J. Bollen, F. Menczer, A. Flammini [2015]. “Computational fact checking from knowledge networks.” PLoS One. In Press. arXiv:1501.03471.

A. Kolchinsky, M. P. Van Den Heuvel, A. Griffa, P. Hagmann, L.M. Rocha, O. Sporns, J. Goni [2014]. “Multi-scale Integration and Predictability in Resting State Brain Activity”. Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, 8:66. doi: 10.3389/fninf.2014.00066.

Indiana University Network Science Institute

iuni
IUNI announcement in Science magazine

The new Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI) unites 100+ researchers at IU — building on their world-renowned multidisciplinary expertise toward further scientific understanding of the complex networked systems of our world. Through pioneering new approaches in mapping, representing, visualizing, modeling, and analyzing diverse complex networks across levels and disciplines, IUNI will lead the way. We keep track of the big picture — ever-changing and interconnected. We’re laying the groundwork for innovative research and discovery in the area of network science.

Radicchi wins first CSS junior scientific award

Filippo Radicchi at ECCS 2014
Filippo Radicchi at ECCS 2014

Congratulations to Filippo Radicchi for winning the First Junior Scientific Award from the Complex Systems Society (CCS), which unveiled the winners of the first CSS scientific awards in a packed plenary session at ECCS’14 in Lucca, Italy. CSS also honored Prof. Eugene Stanley with the Senior Scientific Award, and Dr. Giovanna Miritello with a second Junior Scientific Award. Quoting the nomination:

Filippo Radicchi is among the best young researchers in complex systems and networks, with contributions that span from theoretical studies of structural and dynamical properties of networks to analyses of large-scale empirical data about human behaviour and performance.

We could not agree more.

Social Dynamics of Science

doi:10.1038/srep01069Read our latest paper titled Social Dynamics of Science in Nature Scientific Reports. Authors Xiaoling Sun, Jasleen Kaur, Staša Milojević, Alessandro Flammini & Filippo Menczer ask, How do scientific disciplines emerge? No quantitative model to date allows us to validate competing theories on the different roles of endogenous processes, such as social collaborations, and exogenous events, such as scientific discoveries. Here we propose an agent-based model in which the evolution of disciplines is guided mainly by social interactions among agents representing scientists. Disciplines emerge from splitting and merging of social communities in a collaboration network. We find that this social model can account for a number of stylized facts about the relationships between disciplines, scholars, and publications. These results provide strong quantitative support for the key role of social interactions in shaping the dynamics of science. While several “science of science” theories exist, this is the first account for the emergence of disciplines that is validated on the basis of empirical data.

Welcome and congratulations to YY Ahn!

YY AhnWe are excited to welcome a new faculty member, Yong-Yeol “YY” Ahn, to our center. Prior to joining IU, YY was a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Complex Network Research at Northeastern University and a visiting researcher at the Center for Cancer Systems Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, working with Albert-László Barabási. YY has a PhD in Physics from KAIST in Korea. His work explores  the structure and dynamics of complex systems, spanning from molecules to society.

YY has been selected by the Association of Korean Physicists in America as one of the two winners of the annual Outstanding Young Researcher Award. And to top it off, his paper on Flavor network and the principles of food pairing was the most downloaded of all Nature.com in December 2011. Congratulations!

LaNeT-vi visualization featured on the cover of Nature Physics

Cover of Nature Physics Nov. Edition

LaNeT-vi, a program that represents large-scale networks in two-dimensions, was used to create the cover image for the November edition of Nature Physics. The featured image highlights several nodes in the foreground that stand out from the rest of the network, highlighting the main thrust of the journal’s cover story; the most efficient spreaders in a network are not necessarily the most connected or central. Instead, efficient spreading correlates with spreader location within the core of the network as determined by the k-shell decomposition analysis.

Determining what makes an efficient spreader in a network is essential for optimizing network efficiency and the deployment of resources. As a publicly-available online tool, LaNeT-vi assists in this effort by allowing users to upload their own networks and receive original renderings of their information based on the k-core decomposition.

LaNeT-vi was developed in-house at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University in collaboration with the CNRS, France and the CONICET in Argentina.

CSI Piemonte

No, it’s not an Italian spin-off of the popular TV show. CSI Piemonte is organizing a meeting on Understanding Complexity: a Journey through Science to be held November 22-23 at the Lingotto Convention Center here in Torino. We will have demos and posters on 6S, GiveALink, and the egalitarian effect of search engines. I look forward in particular to seeing my good old friend Dario and my mentor, Domenico.