Tag Archives: complex systems

Radicchi wins first CSS junior scientific award

Filippo Radicchi at ECCS 2014
Filippo Radicchi at ECCS 2014

Congratulations to Filippo Radicchi for winning the First Junior Scientific Award from the Complex Systems Society (CCS), which unveiled the winners of the first CSS scientific awards in a packed plenary session at ECCS’14 in Lucca, Italy. CSS also honored Prof. Eugene Stanley with the Senior Scientific Award, and Dr. Giovanna Miritello with a second Junior Scientific Award. Quoting the nomination:

Filippo Radicchi is among the best young researchers in complex systems and networks, with contributions that span from theoretical studies of structural and dynamical properties of networks to analyses of large-scale empirical data about human behaviour and performance.

We could not agree more.

Luis Rocha

Luis Rocha
Luis Rocha

Professor
School of Informatics and Computing
Indiana University

My web site and Research Lab (CASCI).

Bio

Luis M. Rocha is Professor of Informatics in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University, Bloomington, where he is director of the NSF-NRT Interdisciplinary Training Program in Complex Networks and Systems, director of the Complex Networks & Systems track of the Informatics PhD Program, member of the Indiana University Network Science Institute, and core faculty of the Cognitive Science Program. Dr. Rocha is a Fulbright Scholar and is Principal Investigator at the Instituto Gulbenkian da Ciencia, Portugal, and Visiting Professor of the Neuroscience Program, at the Champalimaud Foundation in Portugal, and the Center for Theoretical Physics at the Aix-Marseille University, France. His research is on complex networks & systems, Computational & Systems Biology, and Computational Intelligence and he is the Principal Investigator of the Complex Adaptive Systems & Computational Intelligence lab (CASCI). He received his Ph.D in Systems Science in 1997 from the State University of New York at Binghamton. From 1998 to 2004 he was a permanent staff scientist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he founded and led a Complex Systems Modeling Team during 1998-2002, and was part of the Santa Fe Institute research community. He has organized major conferences such as the Tenth International Conference on the Simulation and Synthesis of Living Systems (Alife X) and the Ninth European Conference on Artificial Life (ECAL 2007). He has published many articles in scientific and technology journals, and has been the recipient of several scholarships and awards. At Indiana University, he has received the Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing, Trustees Award for Teaching Excellence in 2006 and 2015 after developing the complex systems training program and syllabi for several courses. Additional information about Prof. Rocha’s research, academic and personal activities is available on his website. Contact Information:

In The USA:
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research
School of Informatics & Computing
Indiana University, 919 E. 10th St
Bloomington IN, 47408, USA

In Portugal:
Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência
Rua da Quinta Grande, 6
Apartado 14, P-2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal

Course and research-related blogs

CASCI

Complex Adaptive Systems and Computational Intelligence

The Complex Adaptive Systems and Computational Intelligence (CASCI) group at Indiana University and the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia works on complex networks & systems and their applications to informatics, biology, health, and social systems. We are particularly interested in the informational properties of natural and artificial systems which enable them to adapt and evolve. This means both understanding how information is fundamental for controlling the behavior and evolutionary capabilities of complex systems, as well as abstracting principles from natural systems to produce adaptive information technology.

Our research projects are on complex networks & systems, computational and systems biology, and computational intelligence; all our publications are available online as are news about our group. Additional information available on Luis Rocha’s Website and our group page at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia.

See our current roster and information on how to join our group. As a group, we are seriously interconnected with other research groups and networks: The Center for Complex Networks and Systems (CNets), the Indiana University Network Science Institute, the Cognitive Science Program, the FLAD Computational Biology Collaboratorium, the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, and the Champalimaud Neuroscience Program.

You are welcome to join our mailing list CASCI-L by sending an email message to list@list.indiana.edu from the address you want to subscribe to the list, with subject line: subscribe CASCI-L Firstname Lastname (leave the message body blank.) More detailed instructions are available.

PhD

Complex Networks and Systems Track of PhD in Informatics

The Complex Networks & Systems track of the PhD program in Informatics at Indiana University has been training a new kind of interdisciplinary scientist and professional for over a decade. With its unique interdisciplinary approach, our program offers an exciting opportunity to master the connections between theoretical, technological, biological, and social implications of complex networks and systems in a research-oriented curriculum. The program is hosted by faculty at the associated Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS) who are investigating complex systems in action, from determining how a YouTube video goes viral, mining Instagram data for public-health monitoring, developing models to predict the spread of online misinformation, studying innovation and conflict in parliamentary documents, to understanding the neural basis of behaviors.

Our program is central in a new NSF-Funded Interdisciplinary Training Program in Complex Networks and Systems. The goal is to train students to be “bidisciplinary” in Complex Networks and Systems (CNS) and another discipline of their choosing from the natural and social sciences, via an integrated dual-PhD program. It will seamlessly integrate traditional education with interdisciplinary hands-on research in a culture of academic and human diversity. For more information, including on on how to apply to this NSF-Funded program, please consult its website.

Both our stand-alone and NSF-funded dual-PhD programs capitalize on the new Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI) with over 150 faculty members who participate in network science and complex systems research and who can serve in interdisciplinary Ph.D. advisory committees. Indeed, the breadth and strength of research in network science and complex systems already pursued at Indiana University is unmatched by other academic programs.

The study of complex networks and systems is focused on discovering and understanding how the myriad parts of a system—social networks, the human brain, a language, a power grid, financial markets, or gene regulatory networks—interact with each other and drive the macroscopic behavior of the system. This strongly interdisciplinary field has exciting new solutions for computer science, physics, math, biology, health, and cognitive and social sciences. Our students come from around the world and have a wide variety of educational backgrounds. What they share is a desire to widen their theoretical, computational, and technical skills, and, from the earliest days of the program, to engage in research projects in the wide set of areas faculty in CNetS and IUNI lead in addressing the complex problems of the 21st century. Our students have gone on to join some of the best academic, government and research and development centers in the World, ranging from top universities to the most advanced technology companies. A description of the course structure, core faculty, syllabus of required courses, and graduation metrics is available.

Current h-index (Google Scholar) of PhD graduates from the Complex Networks & systems Track of the Informatics PhD Program at the School of Informatics and Computing per graduation year
Current h-index (Google Scholar) of PhD graduates from the Complex Networks & systems Track of the Informatics PhD Program at the School of Informatics and Computing per graduation year

Prospective students are invited to apply to the Complex Systems Track of the PhD in Informatics. Additional information available for those interested in the NSF-Funded Interdisciplinary Training Program in Complex Networks and Systems. Current students can find forms necessary for different stages of training at the School’s graduate education page; there is also a dissertation proposal set of guidelines.

The CNetS faculty is also actively supervising students in other relevant PhD programs at IUB including Computer Science, Physics, Biology, and Cognitive Science.

We also offer a dual PhD program in Informatics/Complex Systems and Cognitive Science.  The goal of this program is to train doctoral students to think across traditional levels of analysis in the cognitive, behavioral and brain sciences.

For more information on the Informatics Ph.D program, and how to apply please contact infograd@indiana.edu. For additional information about the Complex Networks & Systems Track please contact the track director Professor Luis Rocha.

Groups

CNetS faculty manage informal research groups and labs of various size and scope, including faculty, graduate students, postdocs, and visitors. Given the interdisciplinary and collaborative nature of CNetS, many researchers belong to more than one group.

 

Lagrange Prizes to Arthur, Sinai, Ball

On Friday, April 18 the ISI Foundation and CRT Foundation announced the winners of the First Lagrange Prize: Brian Arthur and Yakov Sinai for their contributions to the science of complex systems, and Philip Ball for his contributions to the promotion of complexity as a popular science writer. The award ceremony took place in the gorgeous Stupinigi Royal Hunting Palace. In the photo, Brian Arthur is giving his acceptance address; the panel included Angelo Miglietta, Giovanni Ferrero and Andrea Comba of CRT Foundation, Mario Rasetti and Tullio Regge (General Secretary and President of ISI Foundation), and Enrico Bellone of Le Scienze. Following the ceremony there was a delicious dinner and a fun dance.

CSI Piemonte

No, it’s not an Italian spin-off of the popular TV show. CSI Piemonte is organizing a meeting on Understanding Complexity: a Journey through Science to be held November 22-23 at the Lingotto Convention Center here in Torino. We will have demos and posters on 6S, GiveALink, and the egalitarian effect of search engines. I look forward in particular to seeing my good old friend Dario and my mentor, Domenico.