Tag Archives: agent-based modeling

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Simulation of Information Diffusion in Online Social Networks

JAN 2018 UPDATE: THIS SEARCH HAS BEEN CLOSED.

The Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (cnets.indiana.edu) at Indiana University, Bloomington has an open postdoctoral position to study how information spreads through complex online social networks. The position funded by the DARPA program on Computational Simulation of Online Social Behavior (SocialSim). The anticipated start date for this position is January 1, 2018 (negotiable). This is an annual renewable appointment for up to 3 years subject to performance and funding. Continue reading Postdoctoral Fellowship: Simulation of Information Diffusion in Online Social Networks

Social Dynamics of Science

doi:10.1038/srep01069Read our latest paper titled Social Dynamics of Science in Nature Scientific Reports. Authors Xiaoling Sun, Jasleen Kaur, Staša Milojević, Alessandro Flammini & Filippo Menczer ask, How do scientific disciplines emerge? No quantitative model to date allows us to validate competing theories on the different roles of endogenous processes, such as social collaborations, and exogenous events, such as scientific discoveries. Here we propose an agent-based model in which the evolution of disciplines is guided mainly by social interactions among agents representing scientists. Disciplines emerge from splitting and merging of social communities in a collaboration network. We find that this social model can account for a number of stylized facts about the relationships between disciplines, scholars, and publications. These results provide strong quantitative support for the key role of social interactions in shaping the dynamics of science. While several “science of science” theories exist, this is the first account for the emergence of disciplines that is validated on the basis of empirical data.

Competition among memes in a world with limited attention

Lilian

Meme diffusion networksIn our paper on Competition among memes in a world with limited attention in Nature Scientific Reports, Lilian Weng and coauthors Sandro Flammini, Alex Vespignani, and Fil Menczer report that we can explain the massive heterogeneity in the popularity and persistence of memes as deriving from a combination of the competition for our limited attention and the structure of the social network, without the need to assume different intrinsic values among ideas. The findings have been mentioned in the popular press, including Information Week, The Atlantic, and the Dutch daily NRC.

Paper on Web traffic modeling presented at WAW 2010

Mark Meiss
Dr. Mark Meiss

On December 16, Mark Meiss presented our paper “Modeling Traffic on the Web Graph” (with Bruno, José, Sandro, and Fil) at the 7th Workshop on Algorithms and Models for the Web Graph (WAW 2010), at Stanford. In this paper we introduce an agent-based model that explains many statistical features of aggregate and individual Web traffic data through realistic elements such as bookmarks, tabbed browsing, and topical interests.