Tag Archives: networks

NetSci2017

NetSci 2017

NetSci, the flagship annual conference of the Network Science Society, was hosted this year by the Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI) with Filippo Menczer and Olaf Sporns serving as general co-chairs. NetSci 2017 was the largest meeting to date, since the conference started at IU Bloomington in 2006. NetSci fosters interdisciplinary communication and collaboration in network science research across computer and information sciences, physics, mathematics, statistics, the life sciences, neuroscience, environmental sciences, social sciences, finance and business, arts and design. NetSci 2017 was held June 19 – 23, 2017 at the JW Marriott in downtown Indianapolis. More…

CNetS team winner in LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge

The CNetS team
The CNetS team

LinkedIn announced that YY Ahn and his team of Ph.D. students from the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, including Yizhi Jing, Adazeh Nematzadeh, Jaehyuk Park, and Ian Wood, is one of the 11 winners of the LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge.

Their project, “Forecasting large-scale industrial evolution,” aims to understand the macro-evolution of industries to track businesses and emerging skills. This data would be used to forecast economic trends and guide professionals toward promising career paths.

“This is a fascinating opportunity to study the network of industries and people with unprecedented details and size. All of us are very excited to collaborate with LinkedIn and our LinkedIn mentor, Mike Conover, who is a recent Informatics PhD alumnus, on this topic,” said Ahn. Read more…

Indiana University Network Science Institute

iuni
IUNI announcement in Science magazine

The new Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI) unites 100+ researchers at IU — building on their world-renowned multidisciplinary expertise toward further scientific understanding of the complex networked systems of our world. Through pioneering new approaches in mapping, representing, visualizing, modeling, and analyzing diverse complex networks across levels and disciplines, IUNI will lead the way. We keep track of the big picture — ever-changing and interconnected. We’re laying the groundwork for innovative research and discovery in the area of network science.

Truthy Team Wins WICI Data Challenge

WICI Data Challenge AwardCongratulations to Przemyslaw Grabowicz, Luca Aiello, and Fil Menczer for winning the WICI Data Challenge. A prize of $10,000 CAD accompanies this award from the Waterloo Institute for Complexity and Innovation at the University of Waterloo. The Challenge called for tools and methods that improve the exploration, analysis, and visualization of complex-systems data. The winning entry, titled Fast visualization of relevant portions of large dynamic networks, is an algorithm that selects subsets of nodes and edges that best represent an evolving graph and visualizes it either by creating a movie, or by streaming it to an interactive network visualization tool. The algorithm is deployed in the movie generation tool of the Truthy system, which allows users to create, in near-real time, YouTube videos that illustrate the spread and co-occurrence of memes on Twitter. Przemek and Luca worked on this project while visiting CNetS in 2011 and collaborating with the Truthy team. Bravo!

Truthy elections analytics tool

Science News cover

Truthy elections diffusion network

Research by our Truthy team was recently featured in New Scientist, USA Today, and the cover story of Science News. The Truthy project, developed by CNetS researchers and doctoral students, aims to study the factors affecting the spread of information — and misinformation — in social media.

The Truthy site charts tweet sentiment and volume related to themes such as social movements and news. It also monitors Twitter  activity to build interactive networks that let visitors visualize the diffusion networks of memes, identify the most influential information spreaders, and explore those influential  feeds and other information about their online activity, such as sentiment and language. Other tools let you map the geo-temporal diffusion of memes, generate YouTube movies that display how hashtags emerge and connect, and download data directly from Twitter. With these analytics, one can begin to ask question such as: How does sentiment change in response to events and memes? What memes survive over time? Who are the most influential users on a particular topic?

For more press coverage go to the Truthy press page.

Folks in Folksonomies at WSDM 2010

Fil will present the paper Folks in folksonomies: Social link prediction from shared metadata (authored with Rossano Schifanella, Alain Barrat, Ciro Cattuto, and Ben Markines) at WSDM 2010 in New York on February 5. The paper discusses homophily, or more specifically the relationship between social connections and social tagging in folksonomies. We show that social similarity measures based on annotations can be effective predictors of friendship relationships. For the occasion, we are making our Last.fm dataset publicly available.