The Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS) is part of the School of Informatics and Computing and the Pervasive Technology Institute of Indiana University. The center supports and enhances the research efforts of the complex systems group, which has been active within the School since 2004. CNetS is meant to foster interdisciplinary research in all areas related to complex networks and systems. On this website you can find information on CNetS faculty, research groups, and their activities.

News



NIH Project to study Drug-Drug Interaction


Prof. Luis Rocha from CNETS at IU Bloomington, Prof. Lang Li from IUPUI Medical School, and Prof. Hagit Shatkay from the University of Delaware have been awarded a four-year, $1.7M grant from NIH/NLM to study the large-scale extraction of drug-Interaction from medical text. Drug-drug interaction (DDI) leads to adverse drug reactions, emergency room visits and hospitalization, thus posing a major challenge to public health. To circumvent risk to patients, and to expedite biomedical research, both clinicians and biologists must have access to all available knowledge about potential DDI, and understand both causes and consequences of such interactions. However, mere identification of interactions does not directly support such understanding, as evidence for DDI varies broadly, from reports of molecular interactions in basic-science journals, to clinical descriptions of adverse-effects in a myriad of medical publications. This project will develop tools that focus directly on large-scale identification and gathering of various types of reliable experimental evidence of DDI from diverse sources. The successful completion of the project will provide clinicians and biologists with substantiated knowledge about drug interactions and with informatics tools to obtain such information on a large-scale, laying the basis for preventing adverse drug reactions and for exploring alternative treatments.



Radicchi wins first CSS junior scientific award

Filippo Radicchi at ECCS 2014

Filippo Radicchi at ECCS 2014

Congratulations to Filippo Radicchi for winning the First Junior Scientific Award from the Complex Systems Society (CCS), which unveiled the winners of the first CSS scientific awards in a packed plenary session at ECCS’14 in Lucca, Italy. CSS also honored Prof. Eugene Stanley with the Senior Scientific Award, and Dr. Giovanna Miritello with a second Junior Scientific Award. Quoting the nomination:

Filippo Radicchi is among the best young researchers in complex systems and networks, with contributions that span from theoretical studies of structural and dynamical properties of networks to analyses of large-scale empirical data about human behaviour and performance.

We could not agree more.



We’re hiring!

faculty hiring at cnets.indiana.edu

The School of Informatics and Computing (SoIC) at Indiana University Bloomington invites applications by Dec 1, 2014 for an asst/assoc/full professor position in complex networks and systems, in the Informatics Division, to begin in August 2015. The position is expected to be filled at the senior level, but outstanding junior candidates will be considered.

Applications are especially encouraged from established leaders, who will have opportunities for leadership roles in the Center for Complex Networks and Systems and in a new and ambitious university-wide network science initiative to be announced.

Applicants should have an established record (senior level) or demonstrable potential for excellence (junior level) in research and teaching, and a Ph.D. in a relevant area, or (junior level) expected by 8/2015.

The SoIC is the first of its kind and among the largest in the country, with unsurpassed breadth. Its mission is to excel and lead in education, research, and outreach spanning and integrating the full breadth of computing and information technology. It includes Computer Science, Informatics, and Library and Information Science, with over 85 tenure-line faculty, 900 graduate students, and 1100 undergraduate majors. It offers Ph.D.s in Computer Science, Informatics, and Information Science.

The SoIC Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research currently has 10 faculty members with strong ties to several other units at Indiana University that pursue research in the field of Complex Systems, including Cognitive Science, Psychology, Physics, Sociology, Political Science, Biocomplexity, and Information Science. Center faculty research areas include complex information and social networks, data science, Web science, social computing, computational biology, robotics, computational intelligence, bio-inspired computing, large scale data modeling and simulation, and science of science & innovation. We are particularly interested in strengthening our emphasis on data-driven exploration and modeling of networks, social systems, and their dynamics.

Bloomington is a culturally thriving college town with a moderate cost of living and the amenities for an active lifestyle. IU is renowned for its top-ranked music school, high-performance computing and networking facilities, and performing and fine arts.



Persistent Systems Project


A new grant to analyze social media for health risks and adverse drug reactions from Persistent Systems, was awarded to Luis Rocha and CASCI.



Best paper award at WebSci14

world_turkeyCongratulations to Onur Varol, Emilio Ferrara, Chris Ogan, Fil Menczer, and Sandro Flammini for winning the ACM Web Science 2014 Best Paper Award with their paper Evolution of online user behavior during a social upheaval (preprint). In the paper, the authors study the pivotal role played by Twitter during the political mobilization of the Gezi Park movement in Turkey. By analyzing over 2.3 million tweets produced during 25 days of protest in 2013, the authors show that similarity in trends of discussion mirrors geographic cues. The analysis also reveals that the conversation becomes more democratic as events unfold, with a redistribution of influence over time in the user population. Finally, the study highlights how real-world events, such as political speeches and police actions, affect social media conversations and trigger changes in individual behavior.

Congratulations also go to Luca Aiello and Rossano Schifanella, both former visitors and members of CNetS, who won the Best Presentation Award with their talk on Reading the Source Code of Social Ties (preprint).



YY Ahn named Microsoft Research Faculty Fellow for 2014

MSR Faculty Fellows 2014

YY Ahn is one of the 2014 MSR Faculty Fellows

Each year since 2005, Microsoft Research has awarded Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowships to promising, early-career academics who are engaged in innovative computing research and have the potential to make significant advances in the state of the art. These fellowships—which include a cash award and access to software, invitations to conferences, and engagements with Microsoft Research—allow bright young academics to devote their time to pushing the boundaries of computer science research, freed from the distraction of grinding out grant proposals. The 2014 Faculty Fellows are seven young professors from around the world who are exploring groundbreaking, high-impact research—the kind of research that has the potential to solve seemingly intractable societal problems.

Among them is our own YY Ahn, who was recognized for his mathematical and computational methods to study complex systems, such as cells, the brain, society, and culture. His recent contribution includes a new framework to identify pervasively overlapping modules in networks, network-based algorithms to predict viral memes, and a new computational approach to study food culture. Congratulations to YY for this highly prestigious award!



WebSci14

websci14We are excited to announce that the ACM Web Science 2014 Conference will be hosted by our center on the beautiful IUB campus  June 23–26, 2014. Web Science studies the vast information network of people, communities, organizations, applications, and policies that shape and are shaped by the Web, the largest artifact constructed by humans in history. Computing, physical, and social sciences come together, complementing each other in understanding how the Web affects our interactions and behaviors. Previous editions of the conference were held in Athens, Raleigh, Koblenz, Evanston, and Paris. The conference is organized on behalf of the Web Science Trust by general co-chairs Fil Menczer, Jim Hendler, and Bill Dutton. Follow us on Twitter and see you in Bloomington!